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Greening of Ceramic Manufacturing

Categories: Rutgers Distinguished Faculty Talk Series
Speaker: Richard Riman, MSE
Date & Time: February 1, 2010 - 3:30pm
Location: Fiber Optic Auditorium

This presentation will introduce the audience to the world of ceramics and their methods of manufacture. Unfortunately, ceramic manufacturing is far from being a green process due to the energy required for drying and firing and resultant carbon dioxide greenhouse gases. The concern about global warming has future legislation focused on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The proposed legislation will have profound impact on the economic stability of ceramics industries unless actions are taken to address these environmental problems. This seminar will summarize some of the green ceramic manufacturing activities ongoing worldwide that seek to address these issues.

Professor Richard Riman received his B.S. degree in Ceramic Engineering from Rutgers University. He obtained his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Materials Science and Engineering. He has been at Rutgers for 22 years and is currently a tenured full professor teaching at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. He is a 2009 recipient of a Rutgers University Board of Trustees Excellence in Research Award. Professor Riman has been recognized as an ONR Young Investigator and has received distinguished research initiation awards from organizations such as NIH, NSF, Alcoa Science Foundation, DuPont and Johnson & Johnson. He is an active member of Keramos, Tau Beta Pi and Sigma Xi honor societies and professional societies, which include the Materials Research Society, American Ceramic Society and the American Chemical Society. He was honored by the American Ceramic Society, which elevated him to Fellow status in 2000. He has authored over 168 publications, 11 patents, and delivered over 419 presentations. His research interests focus on the synthesis, processing, and characterization of ceramic powders and single crystals for optical, electronic, and biomedical applications. Current research projects include a study of how to crystallize hydroxyapatite for hard tissue replacement; how to process polycrystalline hydroxyapatite in the form of coatings and monolithic bodies. Some other projects examine low temperature methods to prepare luminescent nanoparticles which are used for biological marking as well as therapeutic applications.

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