Dept Banner
Dept Banner
hybrid perovskite single crystals
rubrene OFETs

Atomically-controlled Oxide-Metamaterials

Speaker: Seongshik Oh, Physics and Astronomy Department
Date & Time: April 22, 2008 - 12:10pm
Location: CCR 201

Atomically-controlled Oxide-Metamaterials

Seongshik Oh, Physics and Astronomy Department
12:10 PM, CCR 201

Atomic-scale or nano-scale heterostructure engineering in IV, III-V and II-VI semiconductors, and elemental metals has led to many discoveries and developments such as fractional quantum Hall effect, semiconductor lasers, giant magnetoresistance and magnetic tunnel junctions. The key player behind this success is the Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) technique, with which one can grow arbitrary heterostructures of atomic-precision. One of the main efforts in our group is to extend the realm of this proven technology to a newly-emerging and lessexplored material system, the complex oxides.

Complex oxides exhibit much more copious electronic properties than do the conventional semiconductors and the elemental metals, such as semiconducting, high Tc superconducting, colossal magnetoresistive, (half- )metallic, (anti- )ferromagnetic, ferro(para, piezo, pyro)electric, and multiferroic behaviors. Furthermore, researchers have already demonstrated that when two complex-oxide systems are interfaced with each other, multifunctional, or sometimes completely new, properties tend to emerge. This suggests that if we apply the atomic-scale heterostructure engineering scheme to this complex oxide material system, we may discover many more novel properties and applications.

However, compared with the conventional semiconductor and metal MBE's, complex-oxide MBE requires much higher level of technical sophistication. In order to tackle this problem effectively, we are currently building a unique oxide-MBE system, which is scheduled to be up and running by fall of 2008. Utilizing the new oxide-MBE system and drawing on the strong theoretical and characterization support of other Rutgers groups, we will synthesize and study nanostructured oxide "metamaterials" and search for novel functionalities in these emerging territories.

Host: Lisa Klein

Advancing Nanotechnology - IAMDN New Microscopes


Rutgers new scanning transmission electron microscope and new helium ion microscope help researchers develop nanotechnology used to fight cancer, generate power, and create more powerful electronics. Watch the video to learn more.

Click here for additional Rutgers News.

Contact Us

NR03HamiltonGate 607 Taylor Road
Piscataway, NJ 08854

P   848-445-1388
Email Us